Introducing legumes into European cropping systems: farm-level economic effects

Moritz Reckling, Sara Preissel, Johann Bachinger and Peter Zander
Posted: 07.06.2021
Legume cultivation in Europe has declined in recent decades due to decreased farm-level economic competitiveness compared with cereal and oil crop production. The increase in soybean prices in recent years and the public benefits expected from diversified production systems are reasons to reconsider legumes in Europe. Farm-level economic assessments, based on gross margin analysis of individual crops, often underestimate the contribution that legumes make to the farm business. We addressed this deficit using assessments made at the crop rotation level. We explored the possibilities resulting from: (i) the consideration of the management and yield of subsequent crops; (ii) systematic cropping system design; and (iii) changed price relations for legume feed grain. We identified several situations where legume-supported crop rotations are competitive and can create economic and environmental win–win situations to support a sustainable intensification of European cropping systems.

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Preissel, S., Reckling, M., Bachinger J. and Zander, P. (2017). Introducing legumes into European cropping systems: farm-level economic effects. In: Murphy-Bokern, D., Stoddard, F. and Watson, C. (Eds.).  Legumes in cropping systems. CABI.

  • Sara Preissel, Johann Bachinger and Peter Zander
  • CABI
  • 2017
  • Legume cultivation in Europe has declined in recent decades due to decreased farm-level economic competitiveness compared with cereal and oil crop production. The increase in soybean prices in recent years and the public benefits expected from diversified production systems are reasons to reconsider legumes in Europe. Farm-level economic assessments, based on gross margin analysis of individual crops, often underestimate the contribution that legumes make to the farm business. We addressed this deficit using assessments made at the crop rotation level. We explored the possibilities resulting from: (i) the consideration of the management and yield of subsequent crops; (ii) systematic cropping system design; and (iii) changed price relations for legume feed grain. We identified several situations where legume-supported crop rotations are competitive and can create economic and environmental win–win situations to support a sustainable intensification of European cropping systems.

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    Introducing legumes into European cropping systems: farm-level economic effects
  • 2017. Introducing legumes into European cropping systems: farm-level economic effects. Legume Hub. https://www.legumehub.eu

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Authors: Moritz Reckling, Sara Preissel, Johann Bachinger and Peter Zander
Acknowledgement: Legume Futures has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant No. 245216.

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