Optimizing legume cropping: the policy questions

Tom Kuhlman, John Helming, and Vincent Linderhof
Posted: 07.06.2021
The cultivation of legumes is low in Europe. Public policy incentives and/or regulations have a role to play in changing this. This chapter examines six such policies. The CAPRI (Common Agricultural Policy Regional Impact) model, a partial equilibrium model for the agricultural sector, is used to simulate the effects of these policies and compare them to what would happen if no policy action were taken. Five of these policy scenarios are aimed at grain legumes (pulses and soybean), and one at forage legumes (in particular, clover). Three of the policies could be incorporated into the Common Agricultural Policy, whereas the other three are more general in nature: related to consumption, international trade and climate-change mitigation. It is the latter two that are likely to have the most significant effect on the cultivation of grain legumes.

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Kuhlman, T., Helming, J. and Linderhof, V. (2017). Optimizing legume cropping: the policy questions. In: Murphy-Bokern, D., Stoddard, F. and Watson, C. (Eds.).  Legumes in cropping systems. CABI.

  • Tom Kuhlman, John Helming, and Vincent Linderhof
  • CABI
  • 2017
  • The cultivation of legumes is low in Europe. Public policy incentives and/or regulations have a role to play in changing this. This chapter examines six such policies. The CAPRI (Common Agricultural Policy Regional Impact) model, a partial equilibrium model for the agricultural sector, is used to simulate the effects of these policies and compare them to what would happen if no policy action were taken. Five of these policy scenarios are aimed at grain legumes (pulses and soybean), and one at forage legumes (in particular, clover). Three of the policies could be incorporated into the Common Agricultural Policy, whereas the other three are more general in nature: related to consumption, international trade and climate-change mitigation. It is the latter two that are likely to have the most significant effect on the cultivation of grain legumes.

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  • 2017. Optimizing legume cropping: the policy questions. Legume Hub. https://www.legumehub.eu

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Authors: Tom Kuhlman, John Helming, and Vincent Linderhof
Acknowledgement: Legume Futures has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant No. 245216.

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